And the winner for Record of the Year is…

So what do Cardi B and Drake, Post Malone and Lady Gaga all have in common?

They’re all up for Record of the Year at this year’s Grammys.  And, they’re all Auto-Tune users, at least some of the time.

For last year’s Grammys, we told you the (surprising) story of how Auto-Tune came to be.  Dr. Andy Hildebrand worked in the petroleum business – using sound waves to map oil underneath the earth’s surface.  Later he built on that work to build – Auto-Tune.  (Read how he did it, and what happened next, here :  Find out how some musicians – even Grammy winners – stay in tune.)

Some people hate it, some singers use it just to stay in tune (the original function), some people love it, some singers use it to create new sounds altogether.  Some people think Auto-Tune ruined music (T-Pain, anyone?), some people think it’s just the latest in applying technology to music (the Beatles using “automatic double tracking”, 1966)– but whatever you think about it, Auto-Tune is all over today’s music, and most likely, all over the Grammys.  Again.

But really, nothing says Auto-Tune like – Auto-Tune.  Last year, we gave you a couple of the originals, Cher and Daft Punk.  This year, let’s just jump around a little.

A little Black Eyes Peas, say Boom Boom Pow.

…a little Eiffel 65, Too Much of Heaven.

But Auto-Tune knows no genre, of course, so let’s have a bit of Faith Hill – which would be The Way You Love Me.

Or maybe some Vampire Weekend, California English-style?

Well, we could go on (and on).  So we’ll stop now.  But we will, before we go, go out with Major Lazer, and an (the?) Auto-Tune Baby.  Because it really IS a baby, on Auto-Tune (briefly).

And don’t forget to crank it up to 11.

Click here to read more about what’s new, what’s next and what it means for you.

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